Ended on 5/3/2012

JOFFREY: MAVERICKS OF AMERICAN DANCE -  (unrated)

2012 - USA - English - 82 minutes - Hybrid Cinema

Directed by: Bob Hercules

Featuring: Gerry Arpino, Robert Joffrey, Gary Chryst, Christian Holder, Trinette Singleton, Kevin McKenzie


showtimes and tickets

Joffrey: Mavericks of American Dance tells the story of this groundbreaking cultural treasure, known as the first truly American dance company. Narrated by Tony and Emmy Award winner Mandy Patinkin and directed by Bob Hercules (Bill T. Jones-A Good Man), the film documents how The Joffrey Ballet revolutionized American ballet by daringly combining modern dance with traditional ballet technique, combining art with social statement and setting ballets to pop and rock music scores.

The film weaves a wealth of rare archival footage and photographs along with interviews featuring former and current Joffrey star dancers, showing the full history of the Company from its founding to the present. It describes how the Joffrey repeatedly resurrected itself after devastating financial and artistic setbacks and introduced cutting-edge choreographers such as Twyla Tharp, Laura Dean and Margo Sappington to larger audiences.

Featuring rare excerpts from many seminal Joffrey works including Astarte, Trinity and Billboards, as well as breakthrough collaborations with choreographers Twyla Tharp (Deuce Coupe), Kurt Jooss (The Green Table) and Leonide Massine (Parade).


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Posted by : Lhaixza Date Added: 1/5/2012 4:26:11 AMreport this post 
when I was about 13 years old I took a summer class in prgaoohtphy at an art school...one afternoon we went to the dance class where the ballerinas were practicing and I shot some black and white film that when I developed it reminded me of the degas dancers...I know I must have that film somewhere...I'll have to hunt it down at my parents' house...I'd love to try that again. this is such a gorgeous photo. dancers are so graceful and lithe...there's nothing quite like watching them. they don't look real. something that beautiful and natural-looking although perfectly choreographed could only exist in dreams...sigh...

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Posted: June 27, 2006A new spy satellite is circling Earth after a spectacular sendoff Tuesday evening, marking the first time such a clandestine national security spacecraft has launched aboard America's modern breed of rockets. Credit: Gene Blevins/LA Daily NewsBoeing's next-generation Delta 4 rocket fired away from the infamous Space Launch Complex 6 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California just after sunset for the 54-minute ascent into orbit.This inaugural West Coast flight of the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle program began at 8:33 p.m. local time (11:33 p.m. EDT; 0333 GMT). The liftoff was delayed 19 minutes due to strong winds blowing across the hilly launch base.Powered skyward by its hydrogen-fueled main engine and twin strap-on solid rocket motors, the Delta 4 created a brilliant trail visible across a wide swath. Spaceflight Now readers throughout California and even Mexico reported spotting the launch.Crews working on the secretive mission had been waiting years to see the rocket go. The booster was assembled on the pad in 2003, only to have its launch date slip repeatedly due to delays readying the payload. And liftoff plans last October were scrapped a day before launch over concerns with fuel sloshing in the upper stage. Worries about clouds and strong winds Tuesday threatened to keep the rocket grounded again. But the clouds parted and winds eased enough to let the Delta 4 fly from its renovated pad on the first countdown attempt, a remarkable achievement sure to erase lingering frustrations about the previous postponements.The rocket flew south over the Pacific Ocean, soared above the tip of South America, then crossed the extreme southern Atlantic before passing south of Africa and starting its northward trajectory over the Indian Ocean. Less than an hour after the flight began, the second stage motor released the top-secret National Reconnaissance Office payload while flying just east of Madagascar. The National Reconnaissance Office is the U.S. government agency responsible for developing and operating the country's fleet of spy satellites. The NRO keeps details about its spacecraft hush-hush, and the Delta 4 cargo was no exception to that rule.But information made public about the launch implied the satellite was headed for a highly elliptical, highly inclined orbital perch often called a Molniya-style orbit.Sky watchers around the world have made a hobby of tracking mystery spacecraft and using the Internet to trade viewing tips. Canadian Ted Molczan, a respected satellite observer, says past experience could indicate the possible use for the craft launched by the Delta 4."I estimate that this rocket configuration can place in excess of 4,000 kg into a Molniya orbit. The U.S. has used such orbits since the early 1970s for communications and SIGINT (signals intelligence) satellites," Molczan said.Tuesday's flight was the 14th for an EELV rocket since 2002. But all previous launches had occurred from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and none had carried a National Reconnaissance Office spy satellite.The EELV program was created a decade ago by the Air Force to spark the creation of cheaper, less cumbersome U.S. rockets to haul satellites into space, replacing older designs like the Titan 4. Boeing's Delta 4 and Lockheed Martin's Atlas 5 rocket families were born to answer the military's call.Both companies have launched various versions of the rockets with commercial, NASA and Air Force satellite payloads from complexes on the East Coast. And they have built launch pads on the West Coast at Space Launch Complex 6 for Delta 4 and SLC-3 East for Atlas 5.Now, Vandenberg has witnessed its maiden EELV blastoff at last."Assured access to space is vital to our country. Bringing EELV to the West Coast is a next step," Lt. Col. David Goldstein, the Air Force launch director and commander of the 4th Space Launch Squadron, said in an interview."I see it's a major step for our country ... because we have to have that access from both coasts because of the types of orbits that are used."The Vandenberg launch site allows rockets to fly southward for delivery of spacecraft into orbit around Earth's poles for coverage over most of the planet's surface. Cape Canaveral is best suited for launches headed eastward to reach equatorial orbits."Over the next couple years we're going to have a few Atlas launches and a few more Delta launches, and they're all vital to our national security. In my mind, it's a huge step forward to be able to get EELV launched off of the West Coast," Goldstein said."This first Delta 4 launch from Vandenberg is an important achievement for Boeing and our NRO and Air Force customers," said Dan Collins, vice president of Boeing Launch Systems. "Today we successfully validated launching the Delta 4 from SLC-6, providing the Air Force and the nation with the first operational West Coast launch site for the EELV program."With this launch, the Delta team has fulfilled all the EELV requirements outlined by the Air Force. We have a full family of launch vehicles, including a flight-proven, heavy-lift vehicle, a domestically produced first stage engine and now fully operational launch sites on both coasts."Plans call for a second Delta 4 launch from Vandenberg in November to deliver the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's DMSP-17 weather satellite into polar orbit.The first West Coast Atlas 5 is stacked on its pad for liftoff in January carrying a classified NRO payload.Lockheed Martin has retrofitted its existing Atlas pad to accommodate the larger, more powerful Atlas 5. However, the California home of Delta 4, commonly called Slick Six, has a unique history.The site's star-crossed legacy began with construction in the 1960s for the Air Force's Manned Orbiting Laboratory space station project. But that program was cancelled before the first launch.Then came visions of military space shuttle launches to polar orbit. Billions of dollars were spent rebuilding the pad in the 1980s for liftoffs of the winged spaceplane. The Challenger accident and the Pentagon's transfer of its satellites from the shuttle to unmanned rockets put Slick Six back into mothball status before hosting a single launch.Lockheed Martin's tiny Athena booster made four flights from the pad in the 1990s, yet only one enjoyed full mission success for both the rocket and satellite.The new era of Delta 4 started with pad modification work in 2000. Now, there's a successful launch to celebrate. Telescopes.comLargest selection and the best prices anywhere in the world. Free shipping on select items. is the largest dealer of both Meade and Celestron Telescopes. Visit or call toll free 1-800-303-5873.STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. 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The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Expedition 21The official embroidered patch for the International Space Station Expedition 21 crew is now available from our stores.Hubble PatchThe official embroidered patch for mission STS-125, the space shuttle's last planned service call to the Hubble Space Telescope, is available for purchase. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.New GPS satellite headed to upgrade navigation network BY SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: May 12, 2014 CAPE CANAVERAL -- Their services have permeated daily lives for countless millions of people, and now the latest Global Positioning System satellite is awaiting blastoff Thursday to bolster the navigation network. Credit: Walter Scriptunas IILiftoff of the GPS 2F-6 spacecraft aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta 4 rocket from Cape Canaveral is planned for 8:08 p.m. EDT at the opening of an 18-minute window."Civilian users around the world use GPS for highly accurate time, location and velocity information. From navigation systems in vehicles to timing of most financial transactions, GPS has permeated into nearly every aspect of our lives," said Lt. Col. Dave Ashley, 5th Space Launch Squadron commander at the Cape.Flying to and paralleling the eastern seaboard, the launch is timed to deliver the 3,400-pound satellite directly into Plane D of the navigation network 11,000 nautical miles above Earth."This satellite, officially designated as Space Vehicle 67, is also informally named Rigel after the brightest star in the Orion constellation," said Col. Steve Steiner, GPS Space Systems Division chief.The Delta 4 vehicle stands 205 feet tall and produces 1.2 million pounds at launch with its hydrogen-fueled main engine and twin solid rockets. The Delta 4 rocket and GPS satellite. Credit: ULA"Delta 4 has been a workhorse, delivering numerous GPS satellites for the Air Force and the nation," said Ron Fortson, United Launch Alliance's director of mission management. "We are looking forward to another successful GPS launch."It will be the 26th Delta 4 launch and the fifth carrying a GPS satellite. It will be ULA's fifth flight of the year and the 82nd overall.The Delta's flight will last three hours and 15 minutes from liftoff until spacecraft separation, firing its cryogenic upper stage twice to achieve an initial transfer orbit and then reaching the circular GPS orbit tilted 55 degrees to the equator.GPS 2F-6 will replace the aging spacecraft known as GPS 2A-23 in Plane D, Slot 4 of the constellation. The GPS 2A-23 satellite was launched aboard Delta 223 in October 1993. It will go into a reserve role in the network for the remainder of its useful life.The $245 million GPS 2F-6 incrementally upgrades the constellation with improved accuracy, enhanced internal atomic clocks, better anti-jam resistance, a civil signal for commercial aviation and a longer design life, all features of the Boeing-built Block 2F series. The GPS 2F-6 satellite. Credit: BoeingThis will be the sixth of 12 Block 2F spacecraft being built to form the backbone of the GPS fleet for the next 15 years. The full dozen satellites are due to be launched by mid-2016.GPS satellites operate in Medium Earth Orbit and emit continuous navigation signals that allow users to find their location in latitude, longitude and altitude and determine time. The constellation features six orbital planes with multiple satellites flying in each.Users around the globe rely on GPS every day, whether they know it or not. From the overt navigation assistance in transportation to the less obvious role in providing accurate timing stamps on banking transactions, the system developed to support U.S. military forces and their guided munitions has blossomed in the commercial marketplace.For tips on taking pictures of the launch, see our . For details on where the best spots are to see the launch, see the .And if you will be away from your computer but would like to receive occasional updates, sign up for our to get text message updates sent to your cellphone. U.S. readers can also sign up from their phone by texting "follow spaceflightnow" to 40404. (Standard text messaging charges apply.)John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.New GPS satellite put into orbit by Delta 4 rocket BY STAFF WRITERSSPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: February 20, 2014 CAPE CANAVERAL -- Igniting a surge of three Global Positioning System satellite launches in the next five months, a Delta 4 rocket blazed a trail of fire and light into the Florida sky Thursday night. Credit: Ben Cooper/ULAThe new bird -- known as GPS 2F-5 -- will become a primary broadcasting satellite in the constellation when it becomes operational by May.Liftoff occurred at 8:59 p.m. EST, hitting a precise window to replace an aging GPS satellite deployed in 1997 and twice outlived its life expectancy.The United Launch Alliance vehicle darted off Complex 37 on 1.2 million pounds of thrust and headed east-southeast, burning its two strap-on boosters for 90 seconds while the hydrogen-fed main engine burned for four minutes.The upper stage then took over for a three-and-a-half hour climb featuring three engine firings to deliver the payload directly into the GPS constellation 11,000 nautical miles above the Earth in an orbit tilted 55 degrees.It was the 25th flight of a Delta 4 rocket and ULA's 79th flight overall."Delta 4 has successfully delivered numerous satellites for the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), as well as GPS satellites for the Air Force and weather satellites for NASA," said Jim Sponnick, ULA vice president, Atlas and Delta Programs..This becomes the fifth of Boeing's dozen Block 2F spacecraft to be launched. Together, they will form the backbone of the GPS network for the next 15 years."The replacement of legacy satellites ensures the constellation will provide increased signal power, increased accuracy and anti-jamming capability for GPS users worldwide.," said Col. William Cooley, Global Positioning Systems director"We have a lot of satellites well past their design life. In this particular case, the satellite we are replacing is over 16 years old and its design life was 7.5 years. We are trying to prevent any sort of outage and having some backup capability on-orbit."The Air Force plans two more GPS satellite launches in the coming months -- May 15 on a Delta 4 rocket and in July aboard an Atlas 5 -- to to further swap out the old with the new."Sometimes we joke those are getting old enough to vote and some are old enough to drink, and they're well past their design life. The oldest is 23 years. We've gotten remarkable performance out of them, but they are aging," Cooley said.Today's constellation has 31 primary satellites and five backups that remain in the network but don't contribute to the navigation signals. That number will grow to a half-dozen with the successful placement of GPS 2F-5 into the fleet this spring.With Thursday's launch, the GPS 2A-28 satellite is marked for removal from Plane A, Slot 3 of the broadcast system and put into the reserve role for the time being. It's reentry into the constellation would only come in a dire need.All three launches this year will target GPS 2A birds for replacement, Cooley said. Eight were remaining in use going into Thursday's launch."We are really frugual and whenever there's some life capability we are really conservative, we make sure we have options," Cooley said. An artist's concept of GPS 2F. Credit: BoeingGPS is marking the 20th anniversary of its Initial Operational Capability, the point in which the constellation was populated sufficiently to go into service."GPS is being used worldwide in ways we don't even think about and we kinda take for granted," Cooley said."GPS has grown to become a vital worldwide utility serving billions of users around the globe. GPS multi-use Precision Navigation and Timing services are integral to the United States global security, economy, and transportation safety, and are a critical part of our national infrastructure," the Air Force says."GPS contributes vital capabilities to our nation's military operations, emergency response, agriculture, aviation, maritime, roads and highways, surveying and mapping, and telecommunications industries, as well as recreational activities. It is not an overstatement to say GPS is fundamental to today's technical infrastructure and culture." John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Space observatory gets new launch date after hurricanes SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: October 7, 2004Its launch delayed by Florida's seemingly magnetic attraction to hurricanes this year, NASA's Swift observatory has a new target liftoff date to the delight of eager scientists around the world. The Swift observatory is now targeted for launch no sooner than November 8. Credit: Justin Ray/Spaceflight NowThe Swift spacecraft -- one of the largest, most sophisticated satellites in NASA's long line of Explorer missions -- is scheduled to fly November 8 from pad 17A at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.The one-hour launch window opens at 12:04 p.m. EST (1704 GMT) that day.The mission was delayed from its original launch date of October 7 in the wake of Hurricane Frances. Then Hurricane Jeanne impacted a planned October 26 liftoff attempt.But on-pad assembly is finally underway for the Boeing Delta 2 rocket that will carry Swift into orbit, bringing launch much closer to reality."I've been working on this since the early 1990s," said Neil Gehrels, Swift principal investigator from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. "I'm extremely excited!" Leader Swift scientist Neil Gehrels looks up at his spacecraft in the Cape Canaveral cleanroom. Credit: Justin Ray/Spaceflight NowThe $239 million project, which includes calibration between scientists in the U.S., U.K. and Italy, will detect gamma-ray blasts throughout the universe.Several theories have been proposed to explain what triggers these mysterious blasts and all involve incredible cosmic explosions."The best way people can think of involves a star converting to a black hole in the scale of a few seconds," Gehrels explained this week during a news media tour of the Cape Canaveral cleanroom facility where Swift is being prepared for launch.Swift's Burst Alert Telescope will detect and locate the flashes, prompting the satellite to reorient itself within moments to point the onboard X-ray Telescope and the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope for more intensive observations.What's more, Swift will transmit an announcement of the burst detection to Earth-based telescopes scattered around the globe. The ground observatories will focus their capabilities on the gamma-ray burst locations for additional research.Read our earlier science preview for more information on Swift's goals.A two-stage Boeing Delta 2 rocket will deliver the spacecraft into a 375-mile high orbit inclined 22 degrees to Earth's equator. The Delta rocket's first stage is erected at the launch pad on October 1. Credit: NASA-KSCAbout 80 minutes after liftoff, the pyrotechnic bolts holding the satellite to the second stage motor will fire and release. Thirty seconds later, latches pop open to physically separate Swift from its launcher. The rocket stage slowly backs away from its payload, leaving the observatory in a stable state, said Mark Edison, the Swift program manager at satellite-builder Spectrum Astro.A forward-facing video camera mounted on the second stage is expected to provide live coverage of Swift's deployment from the Delta rocket.Just minutes after separation, Swift automatically switches on its control system and deploys the two power-generating solar arrays that spring upward from stowed positions on the satellite's sides and then unfold.Over the next 30 days, the satellite systems are checked out via the mission control center located at Penn State University, Edison said.The science instruments are activated and data begins flowing after the first month. The science commissioning phase could last through the mission's initial four months."We expect to be fully operational by Launch + 4 months," Gehrels said.Swift is designed to operate two years, but Joseph Dezio, the mission project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, says a five-year life is possible. Because the satellite has no steering thrusters or onboard propellant, the two key consumables dictating the mission duration will be Swift's battery and funding by NASA. A worker oversees the Delta rocket's first stage going up on pad 17A. Credit: NASA-KSCThe first stage of Boeing's Delta 2 rocket to launch Swift was erected on pad 17A October 1, following delays caused by the hurricanes and closure of Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.The three strap-on solid rocket boosters were added October 2. Given Swift's relatively light weight and orbit requirements, the Delta 2 will use three solids instead of the usual nine.The two halves of the 10-foot diameter payload fairing nose cone was lifted into pad's mobile service tower cleanroom for storage on October 4.Mounting of the second stage atop the Delta rocket's first stage has been delayed this week due to gusty winds.Final work on Swift will be finished in the Hangar AE cleanroom in the next two weeks, allowing the craft to be packaged in the transport canister and driven a few miles to pad 17A for mating to the Delta rocket.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:DELTA 2 ROCKET FIRST STAGE IS ERECTED ON PAD 17A VIDEO:SOLID ROCKET BOOSTERS ARE RAISED INTO TOWER VIDEO:MOBILE SERVICE TOWER MOVES SRBS INTO PLACE VIDEO:NOSE CONE HOISTED INTO PAD CLEANROOM Ferryflight Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!"The Final Mission" - NASA emblem developed for the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft crew and their support teams to deliver the orbiters to their final destinations at museums.Soviet SpaceFor the first time ever available in the West. 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STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: June 16, 2004To successfully send humans back to the moon and eventually on to Mars, NASA must implement sweeping cultural changes, transforming itself into a leaner, more innovative agency that relies much more heavily on private industry and international cooperation, a presidential panel reported today. Artist's concept of astronauts at a moon base. Credit: NASA/Commission Report Equally important, the commission concluded, the American public must buy into the goals of the re-structured program and lawmakers must provide steady funding over the next two decades and beyond to turn the dream into reality."This is a tremendous thing for NASA," said panel chairman Edward "Pete" Aldridge Jr., a former Air Force secretary. "For years, they didn't have a direction (like the one) clearly articulated by the president now. And it's got to be multiple presidents. This has got to last through 10 presidential terms, at least. ... It's got to be sustainable over a long period of tiem."The sustainability issue is very critical," he added. "The American people have to achieve ownership of this. And they have to be shown the value of the space program to their way of life."The President's Commission on Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy was created by executive order on Jan. 27, two weeks after President Bush unveiled his new moon-Mars initiative in a Jan. 14 speech at NASA headquarters. The president called for sending robots and then astronauts back to the moon between 2015 and 2020 and eventually, on to Mars. As part of that plan, the space shuttle will be retired by 2010, or whenever assembly of the international space station is complete, and NASA will develop a new manned spacecraft capable of carrying astronauts to and from low-Earth orbit and on into deep space.The moon-Mars initiative resulted in part from criticism by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board that pointed to a lack of clear, long-range goals in the space program that contributed in part to the shuttle disaster.The Aldridge commission was given 120 days to come up with a set of recommendations for turning the president's vision into reality. Today, the results of that work - a 60-page report built around eight findings and 14 recommendations - was presented to Vice President Cheney at the White House.A key theme in the report is the need for NASA to cut its managerial ties to the past and to develop a new approach to conducting business on the high frontier."We conclude that fundamental changes must take place in how the nation approaches space exploration and manages the vision for success," Aldridge said in a cover letter to President Bush."This national effort calls for a transformation of NASA, building a robust international space industry, a discovery-based science agenda and educational initiatives to support youth and teachers inspired by the vision." Artist's concept of astronauts on Mars. Credit: NASA/Commission Report The report offers a variety of sweeping recommendations for transforming NASA's management structure and culture, increasing the role of private industry and bringing in international cooperation. But the central unknown remains just that: How to "sell" a restructured space program to the American public and how to ensure it receives the multi-decade support it will need from future presidents and congresses.In a section titled "Why Go?" the panel laid out its view of the answer to those questions. A sustained space exploration program, the report said, would inspire the nation's youth, generate new jobs and markets and contribute to the nation's security by ensuring leadership in high-technology fields. It would also, of course, expand the nation's scientific horizons and answer fundamental questions about the birth, evolution and fate of the universe."Exploring the moon, Mars and beyond is a great journey worthy of a great nation," the report said. "The impulse to explore the unknown is a human imperative and a notable part of what animates us as a people. This endeavor presents an opportunity to inspire a new generation of American explorers, scientists, entrepreneurs and innovators who will provide positive American leadership to the world."Listing three "imperatives for success," the panel said the new initiative must be sustainable, affordable and credible to achieve the public support necessary for long-term survival."The space exploration vision sets a complex course that must be sustained for several decades," the commission wrote. "Obviously, this will require the support of multiple presidents, multiple Congresses and a couple of generations of American taxpayers."And at its core, the vision requires a sustained commitment from the American public."To get the program underway, the president's plan would give NASA $1 billion in new funding over the next five years. Over the same period, NASA was directed to come up with another $11 billion from its own projected budget, money that would come from existing programs.Aldridge said NASA can accomplish the moon-Mars initiative within existing budgets and without the need for massive infusions of cash if the panel's recommendations are carried out."We support a 'go as you can pay' approach for funding, which allows specific exploration goals to be adjusted as technology advances and periodic milestones are achieved," Aldridge said. "This also allows the space exploration program to remain affordable within the resources available. We do not believe an assessment of a mission's affordability should be based on an unknowable and highly uncertain projection of total mission cost."Aldridge said he's frequently asked what that total mission cost might be."The answer is, I don't know," he said today. "I'll ask the same question. How much is the cure for cancer going to cost? I don't know that, either. But I know what I can afford on an annual basis to try to get there. And this is the same model we're using for the space program.NASA'S $16 billion budget, he said, "has to be passed at the levels that have been requested and if that is done, then we can get on with this project. The budgets that are projected beyond that are very, very modest, it's less than seven-tenths of one percent of the federal budget. Most people don't realize that the NASA budget is that small."It's less than one percent of the federal budget and we accomplish a lot for that small amount of money. If we can get that kind of level of funding for the next 20 years, we believe with the right allocation of the activities, such as phasing out the shuttle at the appropriate time and focusing our attention on this new mission, that it can be done within that which we believe to be affordable in this nation." Artist's concept of future astronauts on the moon. Credit: NASA/Commission Report Funding issues aside, the commission's report focused on the need for management changes at NASA.The panel recommended establishment of a permanent Space Exploration Council, chaired by the vice president or some other high-ranking official, that would include representatives of all appropriate federal agencies. Reporting directly to the president, the council would be empowered "to develop policies and coordinate work by its agencies to share technologies, facilities and talent with NASA to support the national space exploration vision."At the same time, NASA's Apollo-era management structure "must be decisively transformed," the commission said, recommending that:NASA should turn over many functions to private industry with the ultimate goal being to allow "private industry to assume the primary role of providing services to NASA, and most immediately in accessing low-Earth orbit. In NASA decisions, the preferred choice for operational activities must be competitively awarded contracts with private and non-profit organizations." NASA's role, the panel concluded, should be limited to those areas "where there is irrefutable demonstration that only government can perform the proposed activity."NASA should define clear lines of authority and accountability as part of a more focused and integrated agency.NASA field centers should be restructured as Federally Funded Research and Development Centers in which a contractor operates the facility for the government. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which is operated for NASA by the California Institute of Technology, is an example of a working FFRDC. Putting other NASA centers on a similar footing would "enable innovation" and "stimulate economic development," the panel said. Some functions, however, would remain under direct government control.Three new NASA organizations be created: A technical advisory board that would provide an independent assessment of technical feasibility and risk mitigation; an independent panel to verify cost estimates; a research organization to sponsor development of high-risk technology.NASA should adopt personnel and management reforms in line with accepted policies and practices in place across cutting edge government and industry organizations.The panel recommended that NASA establish teams to identify critical enabling technologies and "aggressively use its contractual authority to reach broadly into the commercial and non-profit communities to bring the best ideas, technologies and management tools into the accomplishment of exploration goals."Congress should provide financial incentives, the commission said, to attract entrepreneurs to the high frontier. And Congress should re-examine existing treaties to resolve open questions about property rights in space to encourage development of space infrastructure."The commission believes that commercialization of space should become a primary focus of the vision and that the creation of a space-based industry will be one of the principal benefits of this journey," the commission wrote."One of the challenges we face is to find commercial rewards and incentives in space. Creating these rewards is an indispensable part of making this partnership work in the right way. It will signal a major change in the way NASA deals with the private sector, and the commission believes that NASA should do all it can to create, nurture and sustain this new industry."Aldridge said NASA likely would remain in charge of manned launch operations, but unmanned launches to deliver cargo to orbit could be turned over to private industry."What we're trying to get to is to have NASA focus on things that are inherently governmental," Aldridge said today. "Probably the human spaceflight part of the NASA mission probably can't be turned over to the private sector. But the unmanned, cargo-like processes could be. ... We believe if NASA can focus on those very difficult, high-risk, clearly not-money-making missions and look for things that the private sector can do in helping NASA focus its attention on the real exploration stuff ... that's what we're talking about."The commission also recommended that NASA:Seek input from the scientific community to "ensure that maximum use is made of existing assets and emerging capabilities."Ask the National Academy of Sciences to consider "how machines and humans, used separately and in combination, can maximize scientific returns."Use a "discovery-based criterion" for selecting destinations beyond the moon and Mars "that also considers affordability, technical maturity, scientific important and emerging capabilities including access to in situ space resources."Finally, the commission recommended that the president's Space Exploration Steering Council develop an "action plan" to support math, science and engineering education.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:COMMISSION HOLDS NEWS CONFERENCE IN WASHINGTON VIDEO:NASA WORKERS ASK QUESTIONS TO O'KEEFE AND ALDRIDGE Fallen Heroes special patchThis special 12-inch embroidered patch commemorates the U.S. astronauts who made the ultimate sacrifice, honoring the crews of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia.Choose your store: - - - Moon RushThis book examines how the exploration of space, specifically a commercial base on the Moon and Mars would transform our economies on the Earth as surely as the discovery of the New World transformed the old world of Europe.Choose your store: - - - Apollo 11 special patchSpecial collectors' patch marking the 35th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 moon landing is now available.Choose your store: - - - Get inside Apollo!Full color drawings reveal like never before the details of the Apollo Command and Service Modules

Posted by : Hollister T-shirts Homme Date Added: 9/29/2014 3:30:39 AMreport this post 
Posted: January 5, 2011 The Orbiter Maintenance and Checkout Facility was constructed on North Vandenberg to house the space shuttle for postflight deservicing and preflight preparations before moving to the launch pad. The prototype orbiter Enterprise is pictured here in the OMCF during testing of the hangar.Credit: William G. Hartenstein photos Credit: William G. Hartenstein photos | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Spaceflight Now +Subscribe to Spaceflight Now Plus for access to our extensive video collections!"Chandra's Universe"NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory is providing new insights into the frontier of X-ray astronomy.Station's new toiletSpace station commander Mike Fincke shows the new U.S. toilet installed aboard the complex. The astronauts are preparing the station for larger crews beginning in 2009.The Phoenix missionThis video provides a recap of the Mars lander Phoenix and the spacecraft's mission to the frozen northern plains of the Red Planet to dig up samples of the soil and water ice."Debrief: Apollo 8"This is the story of NASA's first journey in orbit around the Moon with comments on the significance of the Apollo 8 flight by several prominent Americans.The Apollo 8 film reportThis is the Manned Space Flight Film Report for the mission of Apollo 8 that orbited around the Moon on Christmas in 1968.Air Force says plenty of good came from Delta 4 test SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: December 22, 2004While stressing the positives of Tuesday's demonstration flight of the Boeing Delta 4-Heavy rocket and the mountain of data generated about the big booster's actions, Air Force officials on Wednesday acknowledged an "anomaly" occurred during the first stage and two university-built nanosats were lost after not reaching orbit. The Boeing Delta 4-Heavy rocket launches from Cape Canaveral on its test flight. Credit: Tom Rogers/T-Minus ProductionsCarrying a 6.5-ton sensor-laden dummy satellite and the nanosat pair, the rocket blasted off at 4:50 p.m. EST (2150 GMT) from pad 37B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, on its maiden voyage financed by the U.S. military and Boeing.The Air Force purchased this test launch as a dress rehearsal for the Delta 4-Heavy rocket before costly national security missions begin flying atop the vehicle next year. The rocket offers the largest payload-carrying capacity currently available in the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) program that includes Lockheed Martin's Atlas 5."The Air Force/Boeing team will spend the next two months going through the pre-planned review of flight data in preparation for the next launch," the Air Force's Space and Missile Systems Center said in a statement Wednesday.PHOTO GALLERY: PHOTO GALLERY: PHOTO GALLERY: PHOTO GALLERY: While climbing away from Earth, the two strap-on Common Booster Cores appeared to burn out and separate several seconds early. The center booster of the first stage finished firing and jettisoned a minute-and-a-half later, apparently early as well, leaving the rocket's upper stage to begin a planned 7-minute engine burn to reach a targeted 100 by 135 nautical mile orbit where the tiny nanosats would be released for a one-to-two-day experimental mission.But the under-performance from the early shutdown of the Common Booster Cores left the upper stage to compensate, forcing its RL10 engine to fire longer and use more fuel than planned.The exact duration of the upper stage burn was not immediately announced in real-time as live telemetry from rocket being relayed to Cape Canaveral broke up during a handover from one tracking site to another.When the next station acquired the vehicle's signal a couple of minutes later, the burn was over. The nanosats were to be deployed in low-Earth orbit, but the Air Force said Wednesday that the tiny craft were released at far too low of an altitude to survive."The Nanosats were released at the proper time, demonstrating a new low-shock separation system, which will be used in future systems. In addition, the Nanosats were successfully integrated onto the DemoSat in a remarkably short four-month period, thus providing a successful demonstration of a responsive space mission," the Air Force statement said."However, the early shutdown resulted in separation at an altitude of approximately 57 miles, which was not sufficient to achieve orbit."The upper stage then re-ignited for the second of three scheduled firings during the launch to reach the intended geosynchronous orbit. This burn was expected to produce an orbit with a high point of 19,650 nautical miles, low point of 148 nautical miles and inclination of 27.3 degrees. Although the exact numbers of the actual orbit reached were not formally released, Boeing indicated the altitude was close to the projections.The rocket then began a five-hour coast to reach the orbit's high point where the final burn would occur to circularize the orbit at 19,623 nautical miles above the planet at an inclination of 10 degrees for deployment of the DemoSat primary test payload.But the stage's fuel supply was greatly impacted by the extended maneuvers to overcome the first stage problem. Instead of firing for more than three minutes to achieve the proper orbit, the stage depleted its cryogenic propellants and shut down approximately a minute prematurely.The result was an orbit featuring a high point of approximately 19,600 nautical miles (36,400 km), low point of 9,600 nautical miles (19,000 km) and inclination of 13.5 degrees. DemoSat was released as programmed into the elliptical orbit with the low point about 10,000 miles short of the target altitude."The EELV program office is leading an effort to determine the cause of this anomaly. The Delta 4 flight featured a substantial increase in telemetry over previous first-flight rocket launches. Engineers will be able to use this data to evaluate all aspects of the mission, including the early cutoff of the first stage. The Air Force has no plans to fly another Delta 4-Heavy flight demonstration."Despite the trouble, the Air Force reported that the demo flight completed these primary flight objectives:Activation and launch from the heavy-version of the Delta 4 launch padFlying three Common Booster CoresSeparating the two strap-on Common Booster Cores from the center booster coreFlying the first 5-meter diameter payload fairing and separating it from the vehicleFlying the first 5-meter diameter cryogenic upper stageFlying the new upper stage through a long duration, 3-burn profile of its engine"We are very pleased with the overall performance of the Delta 4-Heavy Demo in meeting these test objectives," said Col. John Insprucker, Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle program director at the Space and Missile Systems Center and the mission director for this launch."The EELV program and Boeing invested in today's demonstration launch to ensure that the Delta 4-Heavy, the only EELV Heavy variant available, is ready to launch our nation's most important national security payloads into space," said Dan Collins, vice president of Boeing Expendable Launch Systems. "While the demonstration satellite did not reach its intended orbit, we now have enough information and confidence in the Delta 4-Heavy to move forward with preparations for the upcoming Defense Support Program launch in 2005."The first operational Delta 4-Heavy, presently scheduled for August, will carry the final Defense Support Program craft that detects enemy missile launches and nuclear weapon detonations from space. The rocket must fly a trajectory similar to the test flight's intended course to deliver DSP-23 directly into geostationary orbit over the equator. A problem like the one experienced Tuesday would leave the payload within an unusable orbit and uncertain of boosting itself the remaining altitude.A secret National Reconnaissance Office payload is slated to fly on the second operational Heavy mission next December. What type of orbit this cargo is destined for has not been disclosed.Beyond next year's two launches, the long-range military outlook for Heavy missions is sparse."The NRO still has another heavy satellite that will be ready to launch in about 2008," Col. Insprucker said at the pre-launch news conference earlier this month. "After that we've got a little hiatus, I think, until probably the Transformational Communication Satellite architecture comes forward."The Delta 4-Heavy can loft payloads comparable in weight to the Titan 4 rocket that has been in service since 1989. But that Lockheed Martin-built booster is being retired after two more flights next year from Florida and California. The Delta promises to provide launches far cheaper than Titan.Lockheed Martin's heavy-lift Atlas 5 configuration is proceeding through development and would be ready to fly its inaugural flight 30 months from the time one is ordered, the company has said.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:FROM LIFTOFF TO BOOSTER SEPARATION VIDEO:THE DELTA 4-HEAVY LAUNCH (SHORT VERSION) VIDEO:ONBOARD CAMERA RECORDS LAUNCH VIDEO:ONBOARD CAMERA SEES BOOSTER SEPARATION VIDEO:ONBOARD CAMERA CAPTURES FAIRING JETTISON AUDIO:LISTEN TO THE 68-MINUTE PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:ANIMATION PROVIDES PREVIEW OF A DELTA 4-HEAVY LAUNCH VIDEO:RE-LIVE THE INAUGURAL DELTA 4 LAUNCH FROM 2002 VIDEO:ON-PAD FLIGHT READINESS ENGINE FIRING TEST VIDEO:TAKE TOUR OF LAUNCH PAD 37B Soviet SpaceFor the first time ever available in the West. Rocket & Space Corporation Energia: a complete pictorial history of the Soviet/Russian Space Program from 1946 to the present day all in full color. Available from our store.Choose your store: - - - Viking patchThis embroidered mission patch celebrates NASA's Viking Project which reached the Red Planet in 1976.Choose your store: - - - Apollo 7 DVDFor 11 days the crew of Apollo 7 fought colds while they put the Apollo spacecraft through a workout, establishing confidence in the machine what would lead directly to the bold decision to send Apollo 8 to the moon just 2 months later. Choose your store: - - - Gemini 12Gemini 12: The NASA Mission Reports covers the voyage of James Lovell and Buzz Aldrin that capped the Gemini program's efforts to prove the technologies and techniques that would be needed for the Apollo Moon landings. Includes CD-ROM.Choose your store: - - - Ferryflight Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!"The Final Mission" - NASA emblem developed for the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft crew and their support teams to deliver the orbiters to their final destinations at museums.Gemini 12Gemini 12: The NASA Mission Reports covers the voyage of James Lovell and Buzz Aldrin that capped the Gemini program's efforts to prove the technologies and techniques that would be needed for the Apollo Moon landings. Includes CD-ROM.Choose your store: - - - Gemini 7Gemini 7: The NASA Mission Reports covers this 14-day mission by Borman and Lovell as they demonstrated some of the more essential facts of space flight. Includes CD-ROM.Choose your store: - - - Apollo patchesThe Apollo Patch Collection: Includes all 12 Apollo mission patches plus the Apollo Program Patch. Save over 20% off the Individual price.

Posted by : Ugg Fox Fur Scarponi 5531 Date Added: 10/10/2014 3:30:48 PMreport this post 
Posted: May 19, 2004With its retirement looming on the horizon, Lockheed Martin's Atlas 2AS rocket kept its flawless success record alive and well Wednesday with the launch of a broadcasting satellite that will aid the expansion of high-definition TV programming across the United States. The Atlas 2AS rocket lifts off with AMC-11. Photo: Pat Corkery/Lockheed MartinAfter waiting through a half-hour pause in the countdown while engineers in Denver reviewed test data on a different rocket, the final minutes ticked away for launch at 6:22 p.m. EDT (2222 GMT) from pad 36B at Cape Canaveral, Florida.The penultimate mission for the Atlas 2AS, the oldest and least powerful Atlas version in use, was delivery of the 5,108-pound AMC-11 spacecraft into geosynchronous transfer orbit. Twenty-eight minutes into flight, the launch concluded with a successful deployment of the satellite while soaring above central Africa."The Atlas remains the gold standard in launch services today for commercial customers and the government," Mark Albrecht, president of Atlas marketing firm International Launch Services, said from the launch control center shortly after the mission.The Atlas 2AS, fitted with four Thiokol-built strap-on solid rocket boosters that distinguishes it from other Atlas configurations, has been in service since 1993 with a 100 percent success rate during 29 launches.The broader Atlas program continues to ride a remarkable string of consecutive successful launches that has reached 72 flights. An artist's concept of AMC-11 in orbit. Credit: Lockheed MartinWhen AMC-11 enters service later this year, the craft will become a critical link for cable TV viewers across America.Dozens of television networks -- such as the Discovery channels, Lifetime Television, The Movie Channel, MTV, Nickelodeon, The Science Channel, Showtime, The Learning Channel, TV Land, VH-1 and The Weather Channel -- will be transmitted up to the satellite for relay to cable companies around the U.S. that feed the programming to 80 million homes. "AMC-11 will be delivering some of America's leading cable programs, reaching almost every television household with all sorts of entertainment, information, and event programming, including high-definition services from Discovery, Showtime and NBC," said Dean Olmstead, president and CEO of AMC-11 operator SES AMERICOM.AMC-11 was released from the rocket in a temporary orbit with a high point of 22,325 statute miles, low point of 116 miles and inclination of 12.4 degrees to the equator. In the coming days, the satellite will use its engine to circularize the orbit to 22,300 miles and lower the inclination to the equator.Controllers will maneuver the satellite to 146 degrees West longitude along the equator for testing. Then AMC-11 will wait until after the seasonal eclipse period before drifting to its operational position at 131 degrees West."Post eclipse in October, we will start a drift and we will be on-station at 131 in early November, ready to do the traffic transition," said Dany Harel, SES AMERICOM vice president of space systems and operations.That "traffic transition" is the swap of broadcasters from the aging Satcom C-3 satellite to the new AMC-11. The AMC-11 satellite during pre-launch preparations. Photo: ILSAMC-11 and its twin, the AMC-10 in February to replace Satcom C-4, provide nearly 20 percent more power than the Satcoms they are replacing. The AMC pair was built by Lockheed Martin using the A2100 satellite model design and each carry 24 C-band transponders.AMC-10 and -11 form what SES AMERICOM calls its "HD-PRIME" broadcasting system."This evening's launch was picture-perfect and we look forward to bringing AMC-11 into service in the fall and completing the development of HD-PRIME, the only two-satellite system dedicated to the delivery of high-definition services to cable head-ends," Olmstead said."We think HD is a big deal," added Bryan McGuirk, senior vice president of domestic satellite services and sales for SES AMERICOM. "There are more than 70 million cable households which can receive HD today....This is the fastest-growing segment in the subscription area."All of the cable satellite operators are looking to build HD channels. We're expecting at least a dozen more to launch in the next 12 months."The Atlas crew at Cape Canaveral has no time to savor Wednesday's successful flight. The launch campaign for the 30th and last Atlas 2AS rocket is already underway. Wednesday's launch was the next-to-last Atlas 2AS rocket flight. The vehicle is seen here in the final hours of the countdown. Photo: Pat Corkery/Lockheed MartinThe rocket was shipped from Lockheed Martin's manufacturing plant in Denver to the Cape on Sunday, and the first stage is expected to be erected on pad 36A Thursday. Officials are targeting a June 30 liftoff carrying a classified National Reconnaissance Office cargo.That flight will represent the finale of the entire Atlas 2-series of vehicles (2, 2A and 2AS), which gave Lockheed Martin its foothold in the commercial satellite launch business."When we launch the last Atlas 2AS it will be like the graduation of the Atlas 2AS family, which has served us very well," launch director Adrian Laffitte said. "But it has also served as a stepping stone to the Atlas 5. So it is really a culmination of all the efforts that has led us into the future. That is the way I'm looking at it. Even though it is the final, it is also the celebration of what we have accomplished."The transition series of Atlas 3 rockets, which built upon the Atlas 2 while also proving the Russian-made RD-180 main engine for use on Atlas 5, has one additional launch slated for next January from pad 36B. That is scheduled to be the final Atlas from Complex 36, capping several decades of history.The future is the next-generation Atlas 5 family that features various configurations. Those rockets fly from Complex 41.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:ATLAS 2AS ROCKET LAUNCHES AMC-11 VIDEO:CAMERA ON LAUNCH PAD TOWER PROVIDES DRAMATIC VIEW VIDEO:PAYLOAD IS SUCCESSFULLY RELEASED FROM UPPER STAGE VIDEO:OFFICIALS MAKE CELEBRATORY SPEECHES AFTER LAUNCH VIDEO:SATELLITE AND ROCKET PRE-LAUNCH ACTIVITIES VIDEO:WATCH TUESDAY'S PRE-LAUNCH NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO:NARRATED ATLAS/AMC-11 LAUNCH PREVIEW VIDEO:LEARN MORE ABOUT THE AMC-11 SATELLITE Fallen Heroes special patchThis special 12-inch embroidered patch commemorates the U.S. astronauts who made the ultimate sacrifice, honoring the crews of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia.Choose your store: - - - Moon RushThis book examines how the exploration of space, specifically a commercial base on the Moon and Mars would transform our economies on the Earth as surely as the discovery of the New World transformed the old world of Europe.Choose your store: - - - Apollo 11 special patchSpecial collectors' patch marking the 35th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 moon landing is now available.Choose your store: - - - Get inside Apollo!Full color drawings reveal like never before the details of the Apollo Command and Service Modules

Posted by : Moncler Coats Date Added: 11/9/2014 11:18:47 AMreport this post 
Posted: September 28, 2005T-0:00:05.5Engine startThe Rocketdyne RS-68 main engine begins to ignite as the liquid hydrogen fuel valve is opened, creating a large fireball at the base of the rocket. The engine powers up to full throttle for a computer-controlled checkout before liftoff.T-00:00.0LiftoffThe rocket's two strap-on solid rocket motors are lit, the four hold-down bolts are released and the Delta 4 lifts off from Vandenberg SLC-6 pad. The pad's two swing arms retract at T-0 seconds.T+00:58.3Max-QThe vehicle experiences the region of maximum dynamic pressure. Both solid motors and the RS-68 liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen engine continue to fire as the vehicle heads downrange, arcing over the Pacific along a 154-degree flight azimuth.T+01:35.0Solid motor burnoutHaving used up all their solid-propellant, the two strap-on boosters experience burnout. However, they remain attached to the first stage for the next 20 seconds while the vehicle flies clear of the San Miguel and Santa Rosa islands.T+01:55.0Jettison solid motorsThe two Alliant-built strap-on boosters are jettisoned from the Delta's first stage. The spent casings fall into the ocean.T+03:54.9Begin engine throttlingWith engine cutoff nearing, the RS-68 powerplant starts throttling down from 102 percent. It will achieve a 57 percent throttle in five seconds.T+04:05.9Main engine cutoffThe hydrogen-fueled RS-68 rocket engine completes its firing and shuts down to complete the first stage burn.T+04:11.9Stage separationThe Common Booster Core first stage and the attached interstage are separated in one piece from the Delta 4's upper stage. The upper stage engine's extendible nozzle drops into position as the first stage separates.T+04:26.4Second stage ignitionThe upper stage begins its job to place the classified NRO payload into space with the first of two firings. The stage features a Pratt & Whitney RL10B-2 liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen engine.T+04:36.5Jettison nose coneThe four-meter diameter composite payload fairing that protected the classified spacecraft atop the Delta 4 during the atmospheric ascent is no longer needed, allowing it to be jettisoned in two halves.T+14:21.7Upper stage shutdownThe RL10 upper stage engine shuts down to complete its first firing of the launch. The rocket and attached spacecraft reach an ellipitcal parking orbit of 104 by 1,196 nautical miles with an inclination of 62.5 degrees.T+40:12.0Restart upper stageThe upper stage will coast to the parking orbit's high point where the RL10 engine reignites to raise the altitude for deployment of the payload.T+43:34.2Upper stage shutdownThe powered phase of the Delta 4's mission to loft classified payload concludes. The targeted orbit is 601 by 20,308 nautical miles with an inclination of 62.4 degrees.T+50:04.5Begin spin-upThe next step in preparing for deployment of the payload is gently spinning up the stage like a top to 5 rpm.T+54:14.5Spacecraft separationThe classified spacecraft for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office is released from the Delta 4 rocket, completing the first West Coast Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle mission.Data source: BoeingApollo patchesThe Apollo Patch Collection: Includes all 12 Apollo mission patches plus the Apollo Program Patch. Save over 20% off the Individual price.

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