Ended on 10/25/2012

GAYBY -  (unrated)

2012 - USA - English - 89 minutes - The Film Collaborative

Directed by: Jonathan Lisecki

Featuring: Jenn Harris, Matthew Wilkas and Mike Doyle


showtimes and tickets

Jenn and Matt are best friends from college who are now in their 30s. Single by choice, Jenn spends her days teaching hot yoga and running errands for her boss. Matt suffers from comic-book writer’s block and can’t get over his ex-boyfriend. They decide to fulfill a youthful promise to have a child together… the old-fashioned way. Can they navigate the serious and unexpected snags they hit as they attempt to get their careers and dating lives back on track in preparation for parenthood? “Gayby” is an irreverent comedy about friendship, growing older, sex, loneliness, and the family you chose.

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Users Comments

Posted by : adam Date Added: 8/10/2012 3:05:27 PMreport this post 
best gay comedy in a decade

Posted by : Virginia Date Added: 9/10/2012 7:52:34 AMreport this post 
Best date movie in a long long time--a sweet rom-com guaranteed to make you laugh so hard.

Posted by : Lisa Date Added: 9/10/2012 8:57:30 PMreport this post 
Hilarious and heartwarming! Great movie!

Posted by : Gaspar Marino Date Added: 10/14/2012 4:10:31 PMreport this post 
Very entertaining movie about friendly relationships going awry when a gay man and straight women decide to "make a baby". All the characters are true to life and the situations heartwarming and often funny. I enjoyed it alot!

Posted by : Taofik Date Added: 10/22/2012 3:05:33 PMreport this post 
It is not heavy at all! I bought this rtelnecy on One Kings Lane for $80 (I am very addicted to that site- I can send you an invite, with a $10 credit for me and you) . But I digress, I just had an outdoor dinner party- and four adults sat and ate comfortably on this table. Plus the wood is beautiful. It is perfect for a classy tailgate too (Geaux Saints!).

Posted by : Tawny Date Added: 11/10/2012 11:27:34 PMreport this post 
If you haven't laughed out loud at the movies in a while--and been surrounded by other people doing it, too--Gayby is exactly what you need. Really a delight.

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Posted by : Air Max Uptempo 97 Date Added: 11/15/2014 10:44:54 AMreport this post 
S. the agency saidSince the purported"fresh bamboo"and Razgui's instruments were in the same container he lost his entire collection of 13 flutes??and with them his livelihood"They were my life" RazguisaidFinding the right bamboo for his flutes is not easy as the variety he needs is not available in the Americas saidRazgui Hisflutes were made from bamboo sourced from MoroccoRazgui said he must also ensure that the stems are at least two years oldso that they have the right knots and thickness for a proper fluteOnce he hasthe material Razguicrafts the instruments himself heating and cooling them alternately to tune them"You have to tune it one time for life" he explainedRazgui has played the flute for over 40 yearsand performed at concerts all over the world including Toronto and Montreal He insists that he just wants to play his flutes in the time he has left"I must have my flutes" saidRazgui"Maybe tomorrow I'll be dead??but I need to play some flutes in peace" scored a bunch of runs. .. who turns 45 on Friday, Freeview channel 82 and Freesat channel 202.

Posted by : Jordans 9 For Sale Date Added: 11/20/2014 11:14:34 PMreport this post 
STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: January 14, 2005Robert Mitchell, NASA's Cassini program manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., says the loss of one telemetry stream from the Huygens Titan probe appears to be the result of an actual problem of some sort on board the spacecraft."The evidence we have a problem on chain A is pretty clear," he said. "I don't think the continuing playback (of Huygens data from Cassini) is going to resolve that problem. We just need to sort out what happened with it."Engineers at the European Space Agency's Space Operations Center in Germany are receiving data from Huygens on chain, or channel, B but not from chain A. Both systems are identical and scientists should receive almost all of the desired data from chain B, Mitchell said."The way the probe system works, there are two transmitters on the probe and there are two separate receivers on the orbiter so we have two separate, distinct data links between the probe and the orbiter," he said. "These data links were deigned to be largely redundant, not 100 percent, but nearly so."The way we sit now, it's clear that the B channel is coming in loud and clear and up to this point, we haven't missed a single data packet. Now on the A channel, we do have a problem and we're still sorting out what happened thre. But this, I think, will be only a minor lien on the significance of the success that's been accomplished here just because of the redundancy between the two sides."Of course, the reason you put redundancy in the design to begin with is to make yourself resilient to whatever may have happened here," Mitchell said. "So we're still sorting out exactly what happened to the A chain, but we've got at least most of the data we expected to get."Video coverage for subscribers only:VIDEO:STATUS REPORT DURING DESCENT AUDIO:TODAY'S STATUS REPORT DURING DESCENT VIDEO:HUYGENS PRE-ARRIVAL NEWS BRIEFING AUDIO:HUYGENS PRE-ARRIVAL NEWS BRIEFING VIDEO:OVERVIEW OF HUYGENS PROBE'S SCIENCE OBJECTIVES VIDEO:JULY NEWS BRIEFING ON CASSINI'S PICTURES OF TITAN VIDEO:PICTURES SHOWING TITAN SURFACE FROM OCT. FLYBY VIDEO:WHAT'S KNOWN ABOUT TITAN BEFORE THE FIRST FLYBY VIDEO:NARRATED MOVIE OF CLOUDS MOVING NEAR SOUTH POLE VIDEO:OCT. BRIEFING ON RADAR IMAGES OF TITAN SURFACE Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Expedition 21The official embroidered patch for the International Space Station Expedition 21 crew is now available from our stores.Hubble PatchThe official embroidered patch for mission STS-125, the space shuttle's last planned service call to the Hubble Space Telescope, is available for purchase. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Out from the shadows: Two new Saturnian moons CASSINI PHOTO RELEASEPosted: August 16, 2004With eyes sharper than any that have peered at Saturn before, the Cassini spacecraft has uncovered two moons, which may be the smallest bodies so far seen around the ringed planet. This image shows the tiny 'worldlet,' temporarily dubbed S/2004 S1, as it makes its way around the planet. A white box frames the moon's location in the image. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science InstituteThe moons are approximately 3 kilometers (2 miles) and 4kilometers (2.5 miles) across -- smaller than the city ofBoulder, Colorado. The moons, located 194,000 kilometers(120,000 miles) and 211,000 kilometers (131,000 miles) from theplanet's center, are between the orbits of two other saturnianmoons, Mimas and Enceladus. They are provisionally namedS/2004 S1 and S/2004 S2. One of them, S/2004 S1, may be anobject spotted in a single image taken by NASA's Voyagerspacecraft 23 years ago, called at that time S/1981 S14."One of our major objectives in returning to Saturn was tosurvey the entire system for new bodies," said Dr. CarolynPorco, imaging team leader, Space Science Institute, Boulder,Colo. Porco planned the imaging sequences. "So, it's reallygratifying to know that among all the other fantasticdiscoveries we will make over the next four years, we can nowadd the confirmation of two new moons, skipping unnoticedaround Saturn for billions of years until just now.?The moons were first seen by Dr. Sebastien Charnoz, a planetarydynamicist working with Dr. Andre Brahic, imaging team memberat the University of Paris. "Discovering these faintsatellites was an exciting experience, especially the feelingof being the first person to see a new body of our solarsystem," said Charnoz. "I had looked for such objects forweeks while at my office in Paris, but it was only once onholiday, using my laptop, that my code eventually detectedthem. This tells me I should take more holidays."The smallest previously known moons around Saturn are about 20kilometers (12 miles) across. Scientists expected that moonsas small as S/2004 S1 and S/2004 S2 might be found within gapsin the rings and perhaps near the F ring, so they weresurprised these small bodies are between two major moons. Smallcomets careening around the outer solar system would beexpected to collide with small moons and break them to bits. This shows the second new 'worldlet,' temporarily dubbed S/2004 S2. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science InstituteThe fact that these moons exist where they do might providelimits on the number of small comets in the outer solar system,a quantity essential for understanding the Kuiper Belt ofcomets beyond Neptune, and the cratering histories of the moonsof the giant planets."A comet striking an inner moon of Saturn moves many timesfaster than a speeding bullet," said Dr. Luke Dones, an imagingteam member from the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder,Colo. "If small, house-sized comets are common, these moonsshould have been blown apart many times by cometary impactsduring the history of the solar system. The disrupted moonwould form a ring, and then most of the material wouldeventually gather back together into a moon. However, if smallcomets are rare, as they seem to be in the Jupiter system, thenew moons might have survived since the early days of the solarsystem."Moons surrounding the giant planets generally are not foundwhere they originally formed because tidal forces from theplanet can cause them to drift from their original locations.In drifting, they may sweep through locations where other moonsdisturb them, making their orbits eccentric or inclinedrelative to the planet's equator. One of the new moons mighthave undergone such an evolution.Upcoming imaging sequences will scour the gaps in Saturn'srings in search of moons believed to be there. Meanwhile,Cassini scientists are eager to get a closer look, if at allpossible, at their new finds. Porco said, "We are at this verymoment looking to see what the best times are for retargeting.Hopefully, we haven't seen the last of them."The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA,the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The JetPropulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Instituteof Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini-Huygens missionfor NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. TheCassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed,developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging team is based atthe Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo.Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Expedition 21The official embroidered patch for the International Space Station Expedition 21 crew is now available from our stores.Hubble PatchThe official embroidered patch for mission STS-125, the space shuttle's last planned service call to the Hubble Space Telescope, is available for purchase. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Phoebe's surface gives scientists clues to its origin CASSINI PHOTO RELEASEPosted: June 14, 2004Images collected during Cassini's close flyby of Saturn's moon, Phoebe, have yielded strong evidence that the tiny object may contain ice-rich material, overlain with a thin layer of darker material perhaps 300 to 500 meters (980 to 1,600 feet) thick. The surface of Phoebe is also heavily potholed with large and small craters. Images revealbright streaks in the ramparts of the largest craters, bright rays which emanate from smaller craters, and uninterrupted grooves across the face of the body."The imaging team is in hot debate at the moment on the interpretations of our findings," said Dr. Carolyn Porco, Cassini imaging team leader at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo. "Based on our images, some of us are leaning towards the view that has been promoted recently, that Phoebe is probably ice-rich and may be an object originating in the outer solar system, more related to comets and Kuiper Belt objects than to asteroids."In ascertaining Phoebe's origin, imaging scientists are noting important differences between the surface of Phoebe and that of rocky asteroids which have been seen at comparable resolution. "Asteroids seen up close, like Ida, Mathilde, and Eros, and the small martian satellites do not have the bright 'speckling' associated with the small craters that are seen on Phoebe," said Dr. Peter Thomas, an imaging team member from Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.The landforms observed in the highest resolution images also contain clues to the internal structure of Phoebe. Dr. Alfred McEwen, an imaging team member from the University of Arizona, Tucson, said, "Phoebe is a world of dramatic landforms, with craters everywhere, landslides, and linear structures such as grooves, ridges, and chains of pits. These are clues to the internal properties of Phoebe, which we'll be looking at very closely in order to understand Phoebe's origin and evolution.""I think these images are showing us an ancient remnant of the bodies that formed over four billion years ago in the outer reaches of the solar system," said Dr. Torrence Johnson, an imaging team member from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. "Battered and beat-up as it is, it is still giving us clues to its origin and history."Phoebe may be an icy interloper from the distant outer solar system which found itself captured by giant Saturn in its earliest, formative years. Final conclusions on Phoebe's origins await a combination of the results on Phoebe's surface structures, mass and composition gathered from all 11 instruments, which collected data during the flyby on June 11, 2004."This has been an impressive whirlwind flyby and it's only a curtain raiser on the events about to begin," said Porco. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science InstituteDownload larger image version FIRST IMAGE: Images like this one, showing bright wispy streaks thought to be ice revealed by subsidence of crater walls, are leading to the view that Phoebe is an ice-rich body overlain with a thin layer of dark material. Obvious down slope motion of material occurring along the walls of the major craters in this image is the cause for the bright streaks, which are over-exposed here. Significant slumping has occurred along the crater wall at top left. The slumping of material might have occurred by a small projectile punching into the steep slope of the wall of a pre-existing larger crater. Another possibility is that the material collapsed when triggered by another impact elsewhere on Phoebe. Note that the bright, exposed areas of ice are not very uniform along the wall. Small craters are exposing bright material on the hummocky floor of the larger crater. Elsewhere on this image, there are local areas of outcropping along the larger crater wall where denser, more resistant material is located. Whether these outcrops are large blocks being exhumed by landslides or actual 'bedrock' is not currently understood. The crater on the left, with most of the bright streamers, is about 45 kilometers (28 miles) in diameter, front to back as viewed. The larger depression in which the crater sits is on the order of 100 kilometers (62 miles) across. The slopes from the rim down to the hummocky floor are approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) long; many of the bright streamers on the crater wall are on the order of 10 kilometers (6 miles) long. A future project for Cassini image scientists will be to work out the chronology of slumping events in this scene. This image was obtained at a phase, or Sun-Phoebe-spacecraft, angle of 78 degrees, and from a distance of 11,918 kilometers (7,407 miles). The image scale is approximately 70 meters (230 feet) per pixel. No enhancement was performed on this image. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science InstituteDownload larger image version SECOND IMAGE: A mosaic of two images of Saturn's moon Phoebe taken shortly after Cassini's flyby on June 11, 2004, gives a close-up view of a region near its South Pole. The view, taken about 13,000 kilometers (8,000 miles) from Phoebe, is about 120 kilometers (74 miles) across and shows a region battered by craters. Brighter material, likely to be ice, is exposed by small craters and streams down the slopes of large craters. The skyline is a combination of Phoebe's shape and the formation of impact craters. Walls of some of the larger craters are more than 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) high. The image scale is 80 meters (264 feet) per pixel. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science InstituteDownload larger image version THIRD IMAGE: Shown here is a mosaic of seven of the sharpest, highest resolution images taken of Phoebe during Cassini's close flyby of the tiny moon. The image scales range from 27 to 13 meters (90 to 43 feet) per pixel. Smaller and smaller craters can be resolved as resolution increases from left to right. The number of blocks, or bumps on the surface also increases to the right. The Sun is coming from the right, so the bright-dark pattern is reversed between blocks and small craters. Grooves or chains of pits are seen on the left portion of the mosaic, which may mark fractures or faults induced by large impact events. Many of the small craters have bright rays, similar to recent craters on the Moon. There are also bright streaks on steep slopes, perhaps where loose material slid downhill during the seismic shaking of impact events. There are also places where especially dark materials are present, perhaps rich in carbon compounds. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science InstituteDownload larger image version FOURTH IMAGE: On June 11, 2004, during its closest approach to Phoebe, Cassini obtained this extremely high resolution view of a dark, desolate landscape. Regions of different reflectivity are clearly visible on what appears to be a gently rolling surface. Notable are several bright-rayed impact craters, lots of small craters with bright-colored floors and light-colored streaks across the landscape. Note also the several sharply defined craters -- probably fairly young features -- near the upper left corner. This high-resolution image was obtained at a phase, or Sun-Phoebe-spacecraft, angle of 30.7 degrees, and from a distance of approximately 2,365 kilometers (1,470 miles). The image scale is approximately 14 meters (46 feet) per pixel. The image was high-pass filtered to bring out small scale features and then enhanced in contrast. Fallen Heroes special patchThis special 12-inch embroidered patch commemorates the U.S. astronauts who made the ultimate sacrifice, honoring the crews of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia.Choose your store: - - - Moon RushThis book examines how the exploration of space, specifically a commercial base on the Moon and Mars would transform our economies on the Earth as surely as the discovery of the New World transformed the old world of Europe.Choose your store: - - - Apollo 11 special patchSpecial collectors' patch marking the 35th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 moon landing is now available.Choose your store: - - - Get inside Apollo!Full color drawings reveal like never before the details of the Apollo Command and Service Modules

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Posted: January 20, 2011 Flying from the U.S. West Coast for the first time, a Delta 4-Heavy rocket lifted off at 1:10 p.m. PST Thursday from the storied Space Launch Complex 6 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The triple-body booster was hauling a classified payload for the National Reconnaissance Office.These photos were taken 7 miles north of the Delta 4-Heavy pad at Surf Beach.Credit: Spaceflight Now photos by Stephen Clark Credit: Spaceflight Now photos by Stephen Clark | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.History abounds in launch of crucial weather satellite SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: February 6, 2009A last-of-its-kind weather observatory with roots reaching back to the earliest days of U.S. space exploration rocketed into orbit this morning to keep logging environmental records until a long-delayed new generation of satellites is ready. Credit: Gene Blevins/LA Daily NewsSee more launch photos Shrouded inside the white nose cone of the Delta 2 rocket, the NOAA-N Prime spacecraft left its coastal launch pad in California at 2:22 a.m. local time (5:22 a.m. EST; 1022 GMT).The night-owl ascent from Vandenberg Air Force Base was precisely timed to achieve the polar orbit where an aging predecessor satellite currently operates.Valued at $564 million, the NOAA-N Prime satellite mission has the specific goal to further the distinguished legacy of tracking global weather conditions and compiling continuous climate data.The satellite's family tree can be traced to 1960 and the launch of TIROS, the first Television Infrared Observation Satellite. Upgrades and technology advancements have evolved the civilian weather observatories through the decades. NOAA-N Prime is the 43rd satellite launched in the long line and the 16th from its particular series that dates to 1978."Since the 1960s, we've gone from collecting and generating somewhat fuzzy cloud images of weather systems to producing crisp images of clouds, land and ocean features, collecting information about the vertical distribution of temperature and moisture in the atmosphere and developing products to support our broad range of environmental applications. So we've gone from launching weather satellites to environmental satellites," said Mike Mignogno, NOAA's program manager of Polar Operational Environmental Satellites.NOAA-N Prime has a design life of two years. Its sister-satellites have had an average lifespan of 3.75 years, and officials hope to get as much use out of this spacecraft as possible."NOAA-N Prime is going to give us data the same as we've been getting in the past, but its main role is continuity of service and to restore some of the degraded instruments that we've had," said Tom Wrublewski, the satellite's acquisition manager. "So we're looking forward to a fresh satellite that has 100 percent of everything working and also help us continue our services until the next generation NPOESS satellites are ready."NPOESS is the future of polar weather satellites. The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System will combine the civilian NOAA and U.S. military weather spacecraft into a single program, an effort started by the Clinton Administration in 1994.But the new NPOESS satellites have been beset by technical and money problems, delaying the first craft's launch to January 2013.To help bridge the gap from the heritage satellites to the next generation, a demonstration satellite called the NPOESS Preparatory Project is slated for deployment at the end of 2010."The NPP satellite, which carries the instruments that the NPOESS satellite is carrying, will give us the insurance of having a backup in orbit if for some reason N Prime fails before the launch and checkout of (the first NPOESS)," said Gary Davis, director of the Office of Systems Development at NOAA's Satellite and Information Service.Circling 530 statute miles above Earth and completing a revolution every 100 minutes, the NOAA-N Prime will operate in the so-called "afternoon" polar orbit to replace NOAA-18 and its degraded instruments. The orbit crosses the equator from south to north at 2 p.m. on the trips around the planet.A joint endeavor between NOAA and Europe's weather satellite agency has the "morning" orbit covered. The first MetOp satellite in that collaborative project launched in 2006."It's a good cooperation," Mignogno said. "We share the data and we both benefit from the fact that we're each providing only one satellite but getting the benefit of two."Users of data from the polar-orbiting satellites are wide ranging. Meteorologists generate weather predictions, agricultural scientists need the information for drought management and monitoring vegetation and soil moisture and even the aviation community rely on the spacecraft to detect and track volcanic ash plumes for re-routing of aircraft.NOAA-N Prime is outfitted with instruments that provide imagery, atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles, and land and ocean surface temperature observations, all of which are key ingredients for weather forecasting. In addition, the information generates decades-long databases for climate monitoring and global change studies."The data from polar-orbiting satellites such as NOAA-N Prime will be vital to our mission as we move forward to monitor and to predict not only current conditions in the atmosphere and oceans but also to keep tabs on the longer term climate trends," said Wayne Higgins, director, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center.The Lockheed Martin-built satellite also carries an instrument to study the quantity and extent of ozone in the atmosphere and a space environment monitor that measures changes in the Earth's magnetic field and radiation belts caused by solar storms that can threaten astronauts and impact terrestrial communications, according to Wayne McIntyre, NASA's program manager for the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites.In addition, the NOAA satellites are equipped with search and rescue packages that detect distress signals from emergency beacons. Over the past 26 years, the network has been credited with more than 24,000 rescues worldwide.NOAA-N Prime had to overcome the perils of its past to even reach space. In September 2003, the spacecraft was severely damaged in a factory , falling on its side while being moved because workers failed to realize the satellite wasn't bolted to the handling cart. Extensive work went into rebuilding the craft.Shipped to Vandenberg last November, the bird passed its final pre-flight testing and then rode to the launch pad in mid-January for mounting atop the Delta rocket.Two back-to-back scrubs for pad-related glitches kept NOAA-N Prime on the ground a couple extra days this week, but the wait resulted in today's flawless ascent to orbit."The flight was just awesome. We hit the orbit right on the money. The apogee, perigee and inclination of the spacecraft looks right where we wanted it," NASA launch manager Omar Baez said.This marked the 85th consecutive successful launch by a Delta 2 rocket and the 138th overall for the venerable booster that will celebrate its 20th birthday next week."We are proud to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Delta 2 by successfully launching this critically important spacecraft for both NASA and NOAA and we congratulate our mission partners on their success," said Jim Sponnick, United Launch Alliance's vice president of the Delta Product Line.After arriving in space, the satellite sprung to life and unfurled its power-producing solar array. Two months of testing are planned before the craft goes to work as the final weather satellite in the long family history."A bunch of people that worked on this program for the full 30 years are all going to get together a couple weeks after the successful launch of N Prime and just reminisce about an era that's come to an end," Davis said."I think this is a very storied program," Mignogno said. "I think it's going to be a tough act to follow."Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:DELTA 2 ROCKET LIFTS OFF WITH NOAA-N PRIME VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAYS: PAD CAMERA NO. 1 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAYS: PAD CAMERA NO. 2 VIDEO:LAUNCH REPLAYS: PAD CAMERA NO. 3 VIDEO:CONFIRMATION OF A SUCCESSFUL LAUNCH VIDEO:LAUNCH PAD'S SERVICE TOWER ROLLED BACK VIDEO:WEDNESDAY'S LAUNCH ATTEMPT SCRUBBED VIDEO:HIGHLIGHTS OF THE DELTA 2'S LAUNCH CAMPAIGN VIDEO:HIGHLIGHTS OF THE SATELLITE LAUNCH CAMPAIGN VIDEO:NOAA-N PRIME MISSION OVERVIEW FILM VIDEO:PRE-LAUNCH NEWS BRIEFING John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.History of NOAA's Polar Observational Environmental SatellitesNOAA FACT SHEET Credit: NOAASee larger image The first weather satellite in a series of spacecraft originally known as the Television Infrared Observation Satellites (TIROS) was launched on April 1, 1960. By the mid 1970's NOAA and NASA agreed to produce the series operationally based on the TIROS-N generation of satellites. TIROS-N, a research and development spacecraft serving as a prototype for the operational follow-on series, NOAA-A through NOAA-N Prime was on launched October 13, 1978.Beginning with NOAA-E, launched in 1983, the basic satellite was "stretched" to permit accommodation of additional research instruments. This became known as the Advanced TIROS-N configuration. Some of the additional instruments flown include: Search and Rescue; Earth Radiation Budget Experiment, and the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet spectrometer. Three of those instruments, Search and Rescue Repeater, Search and Rescue Processor and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Radiometer, became part of the operational program. The primary sounding instrumentation has remained essentially unchanged until the addition of Advanced Microwave Sounding Units-A and -B on NOAA-K (15). The Microwave Humidity Sounder replaces the AMSU-B on NOAA-N Prime performing essentially the same science.The satellite design life throughout the series has been two years. The lifetime is a cost/risk tradeoff since more years normally result in a more expensive satellite. To mitigate that risk, the NOAA-N Prime satellite uses the most reliable NASA-approved flight parts, Class S, and considerable redundancy in critical subsystem components. The instruments are not redundant, but they have a three-year design life in order to enhance their expected operational reliability. Because of the inherent reliability built in and the extensive ground testing prior to launch, this series of satellites has demonstrated performance well exceeding the design lifetime.TIROS-N was launched October 13, 1978, and was the first satellite in the fourth generation operational environmental satellite system. TIROS-N was a research and development spacecraft serving as a proto-type flight for the operational follow-on series, NOAA-A through N' spacecraft. The spacecraft was deactivated on February 27, 1981.NOAA-A (6) was launched June 27, 1979 and was totally deactivated on March 31, 1987, after nearly eight years of operational service.NOAA-B was launched May 29, 1980, and failed to achieve a usable orbit because of a booster engine anomaly.NOAA-C (7) was launched June 23, 1981, and was deactivated in June 1986.NOAA-E (8) was launched March 28, 1983. It was the first of the Advanced TIROS-N configuration satellites and it included the first search and rescue package. The satellite was deactivated on December 29, 1985. NOAA-F (9) was launched December 12, 1984, and was deactivated on February 13, 1998.NOAA-G (10) was launched September 17, 1986, and was deactivated on August 30, 2001.NOAA-H (11) was launched September 24, 1988. Some instruments are currently in use to a limited degree.NOAA-D (12) was launched on May 14, 1991, and some instruments and other subsystems continue to operate satisfactorily. NOAA-12 was placed in standby mode on December 14, 1998, when NOAA-15 became operational.NOAA-I (13) was launched on August 9, 1993, and two weeks after launch, the spacecraft suffered a power system anomaly. Attempts to contact or command the spacecraft since the power failure have been unsuccessful.NOAA-J (14) was launched on December 30, 1994, and was deactivated on May 23,2007, after more than 12 yeas of service.NOAA-K (15) was launched on May 13, 1998, and is a backup satellite with some degraded and failed capabilities.NOAA-L (16) was launched on September 21, 2000, and is a backup satellite with some degraded capabilities.NOAA-M (17) was launched on June 24, 2002, and serves as a backup morning spacecraft with a failed AMSU-A1.NOAA-N (18) was launched on May 20, 2005, and currently serves as the operational afternoon satellite. The HIRS performance has been erratic due to a suspect loose lens. Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Ares 1-X PatchThe official embroidered patch for the Ares 1-X rocket test flight, is available for purchase.Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.Project OrionThe Orion crew exploration vehicle is NASA's first new human spacecraft developed since the space shuttle a quarter-century earlier. The capsule is one of the key elements of returning astronauts to the Moon.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.Hurricane Frances delays Delta 2 launch into October SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: September 14, 2004The fury of Hurricane Frances put a Boeing Delta 2 launch on hold and prompted extensive inspections, but pre-flight preparations are resuming for the rocket's mission to haul a replacement Global Positioning System satellite into space. File image of a Delta 2 rocket at pad 17B. Photo: NASA-KSCThe rocket weathered the hurricane's powerful winds and heavy rains atop pad 17B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, where the booster was being readied for liftoff September 22.In advance of the Labor Day weekend blast from Frances, crews secured the rocket inside its mobile gantry. The Cape was closed and workers living along the coast evacuated.Once the storm cleared, inspections began immediately to check the rocket's condition. Initial looks revealed no major problems, but additional tests on four of the Delta 2's nine strap-on solid rocket motors are continuing."For the past few weeks, the Boeing Delta 2 launch vehicle carrying the Lockheed Martin-built GPS 2R-13 spacecraft has been maintained in a 'hurricane safing' status at SLC-17B," Lt. Col. Gregory J. Schiller, manager of the Delta 2 launch program at the Air Force's Space and Missile Systems Center told Spaceflight Now."Following a thorough inspection of the launch vehicle and ground support equipment, no significant damage to any launch asset has been identified. As such, Boeing and Lockheed Martin were given the clearance to resume normal operations and is currently targeting a new launch date of October 8."Officials were concerned about potential water intrusion and damage from flying debris. Inspections performed by the Air Force, the Boeing launch team and the company's design engineeringpersonnel flown to Florida from California found no damage of any significance."Witness paint" applied to the solid rocket motors to indicate impacts during vehicle handling and processing revealed that four boosters received minor debris hits during Frances.A "mechanical impedance analysis" is being performed on the boosters to verify their health, Schiller said. For now, officials don't believe the boosters will need replacing."Early indications would say no, but we will know for certain once the (mechanical impedance analysis) inspections are complete."The GPS spacecraft had been undergoing its routine pre-flight processing inside a separate facility at Cape Canaveral. As a hurricane precaution, workers placed the satellite back into its shipping container to ride out the storm. Post-Frances checks have shown the satellite to be healthy."The launch team is moving forward with pre-launch preparations that include testing the launch vehicle's electrical, propulsion and mechanical systems and fueling the spacecraft prior to mating with the third stage," Schiller said.The GPS satellite and attached solid-fuel third stage will be transported to the launch pad later this month for mounting atop the Delta 2 rocket.Liftoff on October 8 would occur during the day's 29-minute launch window that extends from 3:36 to 4:05 a.m. EDT.This will be the third of three GPS launches planned in 2004. The new satellites replenish the military's navigation network by replacing older craft.Meanwhile, the Delta 2 launch of NASA's gamma-ray burst detection spacecraft, called Swift, originally targeted for October 7 has been pushed back to late October because of Hurricane Frances. Stacking of that rocket on pad 17A, once set to begin September 1, is expected to start next week.Swift was inside the Cape's Hangar AE cleanroom during the storm.Additional coverage for subscribers:VIDEO:DELTA 2 ROCKET BLASTS OFF WITH GPS 2R-12 VIDEO:LIFTOFF AS SEEN FROM PRESS SITE Apollo 12 tribute DVD setNew!Featuring the jovial crew of Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon and Alan Bean, the Apollo 12 mission was struck by lightning shortly after liftoff but proceeded on the second successful exploration voyage to the lunar surface. This three-disc DVD brings the mission to life with extraordinary detail.Choose your store: - - - Fallen Heroes special patchThis special 12-inch embroidered patch commemorates the U.S. astronauts who made the ultimate sacrifice, honoring the crews of Apollo 1, Challenger and Columbia.Choose your store: - - - Women in SpaceWomen of Space: Cool Careers on the Final Frontier is for girls, young women, and anyone else interested in learning about exciting careers in space exploration. Includes CD-ROM.Choose your store: - - - Mars rover posterThis new poster features some of the best pictures from NASA's amazing Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity.Choose your store:John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store.Apollo patchesThe Apollo Patch Collection: Includes all 12 Apollo mission patches plus the Apollo Program Patch. Save over 20% off the Individual price.

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