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Cinema Village

Q&As - News - Reviews

  • Q&A with Director Chadd Harbold on Saturday May 14 after 7:00pm show

    Q&A with Director Chadd Harbold on Saturday May 14 after 7:00pm show

    Kathryn, a struggling actress and unfulfilled housewife, becomes involved with her new gardener, Ben. As he gives her the attention and sensitivity she craves, they start to fall for each other. But Ben is not what he seems.
  • RESPECT THE JUX Q&A after Friday's May 6, 8:00pm & 10:30pm shows with: Director G. H. Goba and Cast

    RESPECT THE JUX Q&A after Friday's May 6, 8:00pm & 10:30pm shows with: Director G. H. Goba and Cast

    A corrupted young man ventures to the United States in quest of the American Dream, and forms a band of robbers to obtain it.
  • MANHATTAN FILM FESTIVAL Starts JUNE 10 for 2 WEEKS

    MANHATTAN FILM FESTIVAL Starts JUNE 10 for 2 WEEKS

    The 16th annual Manhattan Film Festival will again be hosted at the beloved Cinema Village. The Manhattan Film Festival was originally founded as the Independent Features Film Festival. Hosted at the then Tribeca Cinemas, it was the first film festival in which film selection was done online via a web-based competition. The festival continued to innovate and became the first to introduce a virtual platform. Shortly thereafter, the State of New York approved a name reservation to become the Manhattan Film Festival. The rest is history. Upon this transition, MFF became a traditional film festival, in which their programming team works very hard to annually program a diverse film lineup of established, emerging, and student filmmakers.      
  • Q&A with Director/Writer Haik Kocharian & Cast on Friday, Sept 16 after 7:30pm show

    Q&A with Director/Writer Haik Kocharian & Cast on Friday, Sept 16 after 7:30pm show

    A story of the friendship between a teenage boy and a wolfdog. When the two are forcefully separated, we follow the journey of the animal in search of his best friend. Addresses animal abuse, teens with undiagnosed conditions, and assisted suicide.
  •  African Diaspora International Film Festival

    African Diaspora International Film Festival

    Welcome to the world of the African Diaspora International Film Festival (ADIFF). In our reality, people from diverse races, nationalities and backgrounds come together to enjoy important cinematic works of creativity, intellectual expansion, identity, and equality. In this world there are no boundaries around people because they are embraced in a universal understanding of humanity. This is the element of commonality that weaves through this annual event of images from Africa and the African Diaspora.
  • SR - SOCIALLY RELEVANT FILM FESTIVAL (March 18 - 20)

    SR - SOCIALLY RELEVANT FILM FESTIVAL (March 18 - 20)

    SR is a festival that aims to satisfy a market need of socially relevant film content and everyday positive human stories while offering an alternative to the proliferation of violence in today’s story lines and filmmaking styles. SR Films are entertaining, enlightening, uplifting but most of all artistically appealing. - www.ratedsrfilms.org
  • The Workers Unite Film Festival 11th Anniversary Season at Cinema Village NYC

    The Workers Unite Film Festival 11th Anniversary Season at Cinema Village NYC

    The Workers Unite Film Festival is a celebration of Global Labor Solidarity. The Festival aims to showcase student and professional films from the United States and around the world which publicize and highlight the struggles, successes and daily lives of all workers in their efforts to unite and organize for better living conditions and social justice. WUFF brings together activists, academics, and filmmakers of all ages and backgrounds for a celebration of social justice and the arts. Through dozens of documentary screenings, community forums, and interactive events across New York City, the festival provides working people with a platform to tell their stories while leading a movement for meaningful change. In recent years, we've incorporated theater production, live music, and poetry/spoken word nights. We are the largest worker solidarity themed film festival in the nation and the only one in NYC, with the full support of NYC Council Speaker Corey Johnson, Comptroller Scott Stringer, NYC Central Labor Council, National & New York State AFL-CIO, IBEW Local 3, PEF, 1199SEIU, The Puffin Foundation, The NY Labor History Association, UA Local 1 Plumbers, UFT, NYSNA, NY District Council of Carpenters, RWDSU, Workers United NY & NJ, and many more
  • WILDLIFE CONSERVATION FILM FESTIVAL October 14 - October 20

    WILDLIFE CONSERVATION FILM FESTIVAL October 14 - October 20

    WCFF's mission is to inform, engage and inspire audiences about the upmost need and importance of the protection of global biodiversity. WCFF does this through the annual film festivals in New York, Los Angeles and Monterrey, Mexico. WCFF also hosts in partnership events in Brazil, China, Nigeria and other countries. WCFF's educational outreach programs take place on college and university campuses across the globe. All education outreach events are free for students, staff, faculty and the public to attend. People that attend and participate in WCFF events are international wildlife conservationists, filmmakers, photographers, scientists and people across the globe that work toward the preservation of global biodiversity.
  • NEW YORK SHORTS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

    NEW YORK SHORTS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

    New York Shorts International Film Festival is one of the largest showcases of short films in North America. Featuring a wide spectrum of film genres from emerging to established filmmakers around the world. New York Shorts has become a career stepping stone, establishing a tradition of discovering and promoting filmmakers who have gone on to be Academy Awards Nominees. NY Shorts offers short-form filmmakers an ideal platform to screen their film and gain recognition in the heart of New York City. In 2012 NY Shorts premiered Ricky Gervais ‘Derek”, which became a popular British television show picked up by Netflix. NY Shorts events include receptions, as well as workshops with industry experts and top filmmaking professionals sharing their practical advice to attending filmmakers. The heart of the festival is the quality and scope of extraordinary film programming to enthusiastic audiences in the vibrant filmmaking enclave of New York City. NY Shorts feels that short-form cinema and its creators should have their own premiere film festival in New York deserving similar recognition given to the feature film and its creators.
  • SHEPHERD Q&A Friday May 6th after 6:45pm show with writer/director Russell Owen

    SHEPHERD Q&A Friday May 6th after 6:45pm show with writer/director Russell Owen

    Writer/director Russell Owen will be making a guest appearance in New York to do a Q&A for the opening night. A young Scottish shepherd, following the death of his unfaithful wife, fights to maintain his own sanity when the past catches up to him.
  • New York Times Review: The Director Lloyd Kaufman Returns With a Shakespeare Spoof

    New York Times Review: The Director Lloyd Kaufman Returns With a Shakespeare Spoof

    Should you be among those lamenting the lack of whale feces and exploding genitalia coming to a theater near you, not to worry: Troma Entertainment hears your pain. And with “#ShakespearesShitstorm” — billed, I kid you not, as a musical adaptation of “The Tempest” — the durable director Lloyd Kaufman lobs multiple notions at the screen to see what sticks. In a movie held together with this many slimy fluids, pretty much everything does.A good-natured dig at addiction, Big Pharma and the judgmentalism of liberal elites, the movie follows the efforts of a wronged scientist (Kaufman) to exact revenge on the sleazy head of an avaricious drug company (Abraham Sparrow). A lucid plot, though, is surplus to requirements as we’re dragged into a debauched shipboard party (cue the flatulent whales) and an interminable crack house orgy, while Kaufman and company gleefully lampoon social-media warriors and cultural appropriation. Wiggling women and tumescent men bump up against a revolting spoof of the elevator scene from “The Shining” (1980), and an animated sequence from the talented Josh Stifter briefly raises the tone. Excrement and other forms of ejaculate spurt continuously, suggesting that this bona fide abomination was even more disgusting to act in than to watch.It’s all quite insane, if par for the course for Troma, which has been churning out these low-budget curios for close to 50 years now. As sitcoms are to TV and Pink Floyd is to vinyl, Kaufman’s film feels made for a more nostalgic medium and a more substance-enhanced viewing experience. Its makers, however, deserve praise simply for living up to that doozy of a title.